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  • Jesse Sowerby

The X factor: How is niche idolisation shaping trends and treatments in the aesthetics industry. A great article brought to you by JS Aesthetics Belper

Updated: May 9


The Galderma report predicted that 2024 would see a surge in treatments that take inspiration from celebrities and characters in popular media.

Practitioners are already seeing this, with patients bringing in celebrity references for their appointments.JS Aesthetics





"Hailey Bieber's lips, Sofia Richie's chin, Kylie or Kendall's this or that: all examples of images I've been shown in my consulting room," shares Dr Joshua Van der Aa, a Harley Street cosmetic doctor, and creator of InclinEyes.JS Aesthetics

"Hands down, the most sought-after celebrity feature of the past few years is undoubtedly Bella Hadid's eyes. In fact, Bella's eye shape was influential to some small extent when I was designing InclinEyes, my signature look."JS Aesthetics

 Bella Hadid's eyes

Dr Jennifer Doyle, oculoplastic surgeon from The Clinic Holland Park, has also seen patients come in with a celebrity muse.JS Aesthetics

"Occasionally patients will come in with a picture of a particular feature on a celebrity they are hoping to emulate. Celebrities can guide trends and dictate what is perceived as desirable and beautiful.JS Aesthetics


"It can be a useful reference point for what the patient hopes to achieve from treatment and form the basis for a discussion between practitioner and patient as to what about the celebrity particularly the patient finds desirable."JS Aesthetics


Amanda Azzopardi, aesthetic nurse practitioner, questions, "This desire to mirror celebrity beauty isn't just about aesthetics but also about seeking validation and a sense of belonging in a culture that idolises perfection. There's a psychological aspect where people seek affiliation with admired figures, finding validation and identity through mirroring their traits."JS Aesthetics


There are pros and cons to using a reference for a patient's aesthetic treatment. Their anatomy may no"It can be a useful reference point for what the patient hopes to achieve from treatment and form the basis for a discussion between practitioner and patient as to what about the celebrity particularly the patient finds desirable."JS Aesthetics


Amanda Azzopardi, aesthetic nurse practitioner, questions, "This desire to mirror celebrity beauty isn't just about aesthetics but also about seeking validation and a sense of belonging in a culture that idolises perfection. There's a psychological aspect where people seek affiliation with admired figures, finding validation and identity through mirroring their traits."JS Aesthetics


There are pros and cons to using a reference for a patient's aesthetic treatment. Their anatomy may not allow for the result they're trying to achieve, but it can be beneficial to understand where their inspiration is coming from, to open up an honest discussion.JS Aesthetics


Teoxane key opinion leader, Dr Saleena Zimri, shares: "On one hand, it can be helpful to understand their aesthetic goals, however it can also set unrealistic expectations.

It's hard to gauge exactly what a specific celebrity has had as it's largely guesswork. They maybe have had multiple surgical and non-surgical treatments. As healthcare professionals, we must set realistic expectations during the consultation process, what might be achievable in one person may not be in the next. JS Aesthetics


Dr Doyle tries to keep communication honest: "I try and help explain to patients what is and what isn't achievable from a treatment. It may be that the reference point they are using is a celebrity with very different natural anatomy, or a different ethnicity or age, meaning that the feature they are hoping to emulate would be unattainable or unsuitable. Being up front with patients on what is achievable and what will look natural is really important before carrying out a procedure."

Dr Van der Aa uses conversation to help understand and manage the expectations of the patient.

"Listening is always key. Understanding motivation, observing mood, demeanour, and body language, how they answer my questions," he explains. "It's a very different conversation if someone's motivation is about chasing perfection as they see it, actually changing or acquiring a look that isn't naturally their own, an obsessive approach.JS Aesthetics


"I explain what injectables and devices can and can't do, I'll talk to them about what they re likely to notice afterwards. I ask them to explain that back to me and I'll ask how they feel about it.

"Sometimes it means declining treatments or explaining it's time to stop.JS Aesthetics


Explaining what's not going to be beneficial and why. I spend a lot of time on this when it's necessary. If I say no, I'm aware there'll be another practitioner on the next street who'll say yes, simply for the money, so education is vital.JS Aesthetics


"I treat a number of celebrities - actors, musicians, models - so I know their insecurities too. They usually don't look identical to the pictures we see published.

Instead, online, we see only the most polished and well-edited versions of them.










Aesthetics medicine April 2024 JS Aesthetics

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